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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 33-36

Influence of freeze –thaw and storage time on some specific human hormones


1 Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria
2 Department of Human Physiology, College of Medicine, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria
3 Department of Biochemistry, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Promise Nwankpa
Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Imo State University, Owerri
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njecp.njecp_14_18

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Background: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of freeze–thaw and storage time on stability of some specific human hormones. Materials and Methods: Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone were carried out immediately after sample collection, after undergoing freeze–thaw at −4°C, −20°C, and −70°C, at day 0 and after 7-day storage at −4°C, −20°C, and −70°C. A total of 100 healthy participants (50 males and 50 females) were used for the study, and blood serum was used for the analysis. Results: From our results, there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) between FSH, LH, prolactin, estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone levels obtained after freeze–thaw at −4°C, −20°C, and −70°C at day 0 when compared with the control for both males and females. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) in the levels of FSH, LH, prolactin, estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone levels obtained after freeze–thaw at 7-day storage at −4°C, −20°C, and −70°C in both males and females when compared with the control. Conclusion: The results showed that the specific hormones studied were most stable when stored at −70°C for 7 days assuming sample analysis is not carried out shortly after sample collection.


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