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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-5

Trichomonas vaginalis infection among women of reproductive age in a rural community in Nigeria


1 Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, Edo State, Nigeria
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Irrua Specialist Hospital, Irrua, Edo State, Nigeria
3 Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Natural Science, Igbinedion University, Okada, Edo State, Nigeria
4 Immunology Unit, Department of Chemical Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria; Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, St George's University of London and Kingston University, Kingston, UK

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Bankole Henry Oladeinde
Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University, Okada, Edo State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njecp.njecp_35_15

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Background: Trichomonas vaginalis infection is associated with adverse reproductive outcomes and an increased risk for HIV transmission. Data on the prevalence of trichomoniasis among women in rural Nigeria are sparse. Against this background, this study aimed at determining the prevalence and associated risk factors for T. vaginalis infection among women of reproductive age in rural Okada community of Edo State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A pair of high vaginal swabs was collected from 311 women (consisting of 217 pregnant and 94 nonpregnant women) and examined microscopically for the presence of T. vaginalis. A detailed questionnaire was used to obtain demographic information from the study participants. Results: The overall prevalence of T. vaginalis infection was 7.7%. Although the prevalence of T. vaginalis infection was higher among pregnant than nonpregnant women, the difference was not statistically significant (pregnant vs. nonpregnant: 8.2% vs. 6.4%; odds ratio = 1.327, 95% confidence interval = 0.509, 3.457, P = 0.649). The prevalence of Trichomoniasis was not significantly affected by age, marital status, occupation, and educational status among pregnant and nonpregnant women (P > 0.05). The prevalence of T. vaginalis was significantly (P = 0.004) higher among pregnant women in polygamous unions than their counterparts in monogamous ones. Conclusions: The prevalence of T. vaginalsis infection was high and not significantly affected by pregnancy status. Of all factors examined, only the type of marriage was found to significantly affect the prevalence of T. vaginalis infection among pregnant category of study participants. Increased emphasis on screening of trichomoniasis among rural women is advocated.


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