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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 10-14

The efficacy of interferential therapy and exercise therapy in the treatment of low back pain


1 Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Physiotherapy, Regional Hospital, Hohoe, Volta Region, Ghana

Correspondence Address:
O A Olawale
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, PMB 12003, Lagos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2348-0149.135610

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Background/Purpose: Low back pain (LBP) is an important public health problem. It is one of the most expensive conditions in musculoskeletal health care; hence the need for a safe, efficacious and cost effective management. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of interferential therapy and exercise therapy in the treatment of LBP. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five subjects diagnosed with low back pain participated in the study. The subjects (29 males and 36 females) were aged between 20-66 years (mean age 46.45 ± 11.90 years). Each subject was treated with interferential therapy (IFT) and some specific spinal-based therapeutic exercises thrice weekly. Assessment of pain intensity and spinal range of movements were carried out with Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Modified Schober Technique (MST) respectively. Measurements were carried out before and after eight weeks of treatment. Results: There was a statistically significant decrease in pain from 6.29 ± 2.16 before treatment to 2.54 ± 1.86 after treatment (P < 0.001). Spinal flexion increased from 3.44 ± 1.7 cm pretreatment to 5.22 ± 1.59 cm after 8 weeks of treatment (P < 0.01). Also, spinal extension increased from 1.2 ± 0.62 cm pretreatment to 2.29 ± 0.63 cm after 8 weeks of treatment (P < 0.001). Subjects with pain localized to the lower back and those with pain radiating to lower limbs had significant improvements from the treatment. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that interferential therapy combined with exercise therapy could help to reduce pain intensity and increase spinal range of motion in patients with low back pain.


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